Oxford’s School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies (SIAS) boasts the largest community of Area Studies scholars anywhere. We have research and teaching programmes dedicated to the Middle East, Africa, Latin America, South Asia, China, Israel, Japan, Russia and Eastern Europe. The School offers nine Master's degrees and welcomes students from all around the globe.
 
Upon completion of their degrees, our superbly trained UK, EU and overseas graduates go on to transform the world. Many pursue doctorate studies and teaching careers, thus preserving crucial intellectual capital further into the future. Other graduates take up high profile posts in international agencies, global NGOs, international governments, the diplomatic service of various countries, the military, media and journalism, business consultancy, banking, and law.
 
In the UK’s 2014 nationwide survey of student satisfaction across the higher education sector, three of Oxford’s five Area Studies taught master's programmes achieved satisfaction levels between 96 and 100%, well above both national and university averages. Oxford’s Area Studies department is consistently ranked amongst the top echelon and a recent ranking by QS University Rankings placed us first in the world.  To read more about the School and its importance in the University and beyond, please click here.

 

Latest News

New Scott Family Scholarship

The Nissan Institute and St. Antony’s College are pleased to announce the introduction of the new Scott Family Scholarship for a student who studies for a one-year (MSc) or two-year (MPhil) degree in Modern Japanese Studies.  Special consideration will be given to a student with a disability.

Events

Latin American History Seminar: Knowledge and Nationalism in Nineteenth-Century Spanish America

Thursday, 13 October, 2016 - 17:00 to 18:30
LAC Seminar Room, 1 Church Walk, Oxford

Nicola Miller is Professor of Latin American History at UCL.  She has published widely on the intellectual, cultural and international history of the Americas.  She currently holds a Research Fellowship funded by the Leverhulme Trust to work on a history of knowledge and

Speaker(s): 
Nicola Miller, University College London